Kai and her ferret Leo

img_5763Let me tell you a story about one of our younger members in the Manitoba Ferret Association.  Kai wanted to have a ferret for a pet.  She knew she would have to convince her mom that it was a good idea.

Kai knew the best way to do that was by learning everything she could about ferrets.

I sure wish more grownups would have done their due diligence like Kai!

Kai learned all kinds of neat things about ferrets.  She got to work and wrote out lots of ferret facts on pieces of paper and put them up on her wall.  This way she could study her ferret facts and become an expert. Every day she researched ferret web sites. Kai went to the library and found a book about ferrets. Kai worked very hard.

Terri (Kai’s mom) was very surprised by all of Kai’s hard work. The hard work paid off. Kai and Terri came to visit the main shelter. Deb at the main shelter was not sure that Kai was old enough for the responsibility of taking care of a ferret.  Deb told Kai that having a ferret was nothing like looking after her cats at home or a bunny or gerbil or even a guinea pig.  Deb started asking questions. Kai didn’t hesitate at all; and best of all she had the right answers.  

Deb showed Kai and Terri Lou aka Leo. Kai reached for Leo and gently cradled him. She had no fear.  Leo in turn gave Kai little kisses. It was love at first sight for both of them!

 Leo say’s he is the luckiest ferret in all of Winnipeg.  Kai plays with him every day.  They are best buddies. She has taken him outside to play in a safe playpen.  Kai has taken him for walks. Best of all Kai gives him lots of cuddles that puts him in cuddle heaven!

For Christmas Kai was thrilled to get a stroller so she can take Leo on longer walks in the neighborhood. Leo approves!

Leo has made friends with the family cats.  They share their cat condo with him. Now he even sleeps with them. Leo is never lonely.

Fred, the MFA president had a chance to speak with Kai about her learning about ferrets.  In a telephone interview Fred asked Kai the following questions (Kai was not aware which questions Fred was going to ask her, she only knew that the president of the association wanted to talk to her).

Fred: What is the most important thing you learnt about ferrets.

Kai: I learnt that ferrets are carnivores like cats and they need meat in their diet

Fred:  What are their wild cousins?

Kai:  Ferrets are related to Skunks and Badgers. Kai knows all about the Black Footed Ferrets which is the domesticated ferrets wild cousin.

Fred: How do you play with your ferret?

Kai:I let him run around the house when we home.   Leo plays with their two cats… they’re the best of friends and even eat together from the same food dish when he’s out of his house.  When she is at school or they are out, Leo stays in his own house for safety.

I also take him for walks, but mostly he takes me  for walks… he mainly goes where he wants to… 

We have a playpen they put in their back yard for Leo, and in the fall we took him outside everyday to play in a pile of leaves they put in the playpen… and he LOVED it… but it’s a little too cold for him outside in the winter…

Kai:  I tried to dress Leo up but he is too wiggly for that.  I got a stroller for Christmas so that I can take Leo for long walks this summer.  My cat thinks he should come along too.

Terri has fallen in love with Leo too.  She honestly didn’t think she would bond with a ferret but Leo has stolen her heart too.

Hank ‘s Close Call

Hank’s Close Call (as shared with Deb)

Hank is one of our three fur babies. He has a cinnamon coat, is one and a half years old, and is probably one of the most well-mannered ferrets around. He’s had many great adventures since he came to live with us but just last week after one of Hank’s big romps around the house is where his next adventure began.

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Hank along with his one-year-old sable little  brother  Riley, and three-year-old marked white older sister Darla were having their daily fun time outside of their cage. Under the watchful eyes of their feline sisters Francine and Lucy, all three ferrets were bouncing around having a grand old time. The room was full of dooks and the pitter-patter of their little feet as they chased each other around. Hank was paying close attention to the new automatic cat feeder that had suddenly appeared in the room. Unbeknownst to him his feline food dish had been moved downstairs in order to be closer to their litterbox (Francine has a hard time remembering where to go when the time arrives).

Playtime continued until pretty soon we realized that it was suddenly a lot quieter and that someone was missing. After some investigation we realized that Hank had quietly retired back into his cage and was curled up under his blanket. Peculiar we thought, but he must just be tired after his playtime. Riley and Darla finished their play-time and soon it was bed time. Hank was still laying in his cage; he wasn’t sleeping though, just staring at nothing in particular. After picking him up we realized how lethargic he was. He just laid there in Teekca’s arms with his head down. Very  strange. We thought maybe he was just very tired from his playtime so we put him back in his cage to sleep.

Thursday, January 5, 2017

In the morning Hank perked up like he usually did when we fill up their food bowl and he walked around a bit. He seemed to be well rested and back to normal. Fast forward a few hours to around 4:30pm after we were done work. Teekca noticed that Hank was just lying there in his cage like the night before. She picked him up and found that he was drooling… a lot. He also didn’t eat or drink anything all day. This was when we knew for sure that something was not right. We immediately got on the phone and called our vet at Tuxedo Animal Hospital. We needed him to be seen right away.

Unfortunately, Hank’s vet was not scheduled to be in until 9:00 am the next morning. They suggested we phone Henderson Veterinary. Same  thing. No one would be able to see him until the following morning at 9:00 am. This continued for a while. Birchwood? Nope. Sage Creek? Nope. Centennial? Nope. Southglen? Nope. We were told to contact Winrose. Finally, someone would be able to see Hank at 7:30pm – a bit later than we wanted but this was better than waiting until the next morning. After the vet technician heard Hanks symptoms she briefly put me on hold and spoke with the vet. The vet wanted us to bring him in ASAP.

We packed Hank up as quickly as we could and drove down to Winrose Animal Hospital to meet with Dr. McDonald. Hank was brought into the examination room immediately. We took Hank out of his carrier and all he did was lay on the table like he was speed bumping. A  very sad speed bump. We were both so worried for Hank because we have never seen him behave like this before. We brought Dr. McDonald up to date on everything and even mentioned that Hank ate some of Francine and Lucy’s kitten food the night before. Dr. McDonald immediately took his temperature and heart rate. She found that his body temperature was somewhere around 34 degrees (extremely low), and his heart rate was very slow as well. She said these are usually the symptoms of organ failure. Our little Hank was very, very sick.

They immediately brought him in for x-rays to check for a blockage and wrapped him in heat to try bring his body temperature back up. Nothing showed up on his x-rays to immediately to  indicate a foreign body, but the area around his pancreas showed up foggy (usually caused by inflammation). They still did not want to rule out that Hank had eaten something that would have caused a blockage (objects like string and foam do not show up well on x-rays). They decided to give Hank fluids under his skin to keep him hydrated, force fed him some medicated digestive food, and gave him some anti-inflammatory medication. Dr. McDonald told us to take Hank home for the night and make sure we keep him warm. We needed to get Hank’s body temperature up again – this was very important. We scheduled a follow up appointment for 9:00am the next morning.

Friday, January 6, 2017

We brought Hank in for his follow up appointment first thing the next morning and found that Hank’s temperature and heart rate increased and was almost close to normal. Unfortunately, there was no improvement to his behaviour and he had still yet to eat or drink anything on his own. Dr. McDonald hospitalized him for the day so they could do blood work and more tests. Throughout the day they gave Hank a barium swallow followed by an x-ray. The barium in his body would ‘light up’ under x-ray and would give a better idea if there was a blockage.

They drew blood for testing, gave him an IV (which of course he pulled out twice), some pain killers, and kept him under heat. The new x-rays showed that the barium did not make it past his stomach except for a small amount that made it to his colon. This was an indication of a blockage although there was still no indication of a foreign body. The blood tests showed a high red blood cell count (sign of dehydration), low creatinine level (caused by low protein), and immature red blood cells (result of inflammation). His blood sugar was normal at 10.5 which ruled out insulinoma. His lipase level (pancreatic enzyme) was extremely high at 3475. Normal lipase levels for ferrets are anywhere between 0-200. This was extremely worrying. Dr. McDonald immediately began treating Hank for pancreatitis. Dr. McDonald gave us a brief lesson on pancreatitis.

This is a condition mostly found in cats and dogs and there is very limited knowledge of it in ferrets. Wonderful, right? She told us that the pancreas is an organ that produces hormones (like insulin) and secretes enzymes into the intestines to aid digestion. Nestled between the stomach and small intestine, it tends to swell (usually painfully and potentially fatally) when it’s egregiously insulted through a variety of different causes like rapid change in diet and/or high fat intake (perhaps kitten food?).

This inflammation and its effects on the body are referred to as pancreatitis. When pancreatitis occurs, the pancreas releases enzymes and other substances into the surrounding area of the abdomen. These substances cause localized inflammation that damages the pancreas and nearby organs and can lead to life-threatening complications. Essentially the organs begin to digest themselves. This is why Hank was so lethargic and quiet. His body was eating itself and he was dying. This was now a life and death situation.

Our options now were to simply continue his anti-inflammatory medication and hope for a change (anti-inflammatory medication takes around 1-3 days show change) or we could admit Hank for exploratory surgery. At this point  Dr. McDonald still has not ruled out a blockage due to a foreign body. If they found a foreign body in his stomach and/or digestive tract they would remove it, if they found that there was nothing there then they would simply stitch him up and continue his medication.  Dr .McDonald offered to give Hank an ultrasound free of charge to check if anything appeared that would indicate a foreign body. After the ultrasound there was still no indication of a foreign body. This was strange since there was obviously something preventing anything from going past his stomach.

At this point we had to sit down and have the hard talk about how far we were willing to go for Hank. We had spent over $700.00 on his vet bills up to this point. Would we pay the $1090 for Hank’s surgery? Would we just simply wait for things to get better? We ultimately decided that we would do whatever necessary to get Hank back to normal. Hank was the first ferret that both of us had ever seen and held, he was our first fur baby and he was part of the family. Both of us have very supportive families so we decided to start a GoFundMe page for Hank. We managed to raise almost $400.00 om our friends and family to put towards Hanks vet bills (Thank you Deb for your generous donation of $50.00!).

We thought about what to do logically. Hank already had two rounds of x-rays done and they could not find any sort of foreign body. He even had an ultrasound that indicated the same. His lipase levels were extremely high and his first x-rays showed up foggy around his pancreas. We figured that the inflammation around his pancreas was causing his organs to inflame so much that nothing would pass. This had to be it. Hank was dying and the last thing we wanted was for him to undergo a surgery that might ultimately be for nothing. We decided to just let Hank continue with his anti-inflammatory medication and wait for it to kick in. If there was no change by Monday, we would bring Hank in for surgery.

Dr. McDonald respected our decision and she showed us how give Hank his medication and how to force feed him with a syringe as he still was not eating at this point. They gave him enough liquid under his skin to keep him hydrated until Monday although this time they warmed it up to help him with his temperature and off we went. We brought Hank home and hoped that his mediation would begin to show change. We even went out and bought Hank a nice warm heated blanket. We attempted to give Hank his medication for the first time that evening and we found out how much a ferret can struggle regardless of how sick they are. It was like wrestling with a big old fish!

Saturday, January 7, 2017

We checked on Hank first thing in the morning and wonderful news… Hank pooped! We didn’t realize how happy one could get over a little bit of poop. Things were obviously getting back to normal inside Hanks little body. He was still a little lethargic but he perked his little head up to say good morning and as if to say “I’m feeling a little better today”.

We phoned the vet to give an update and we decided that we will not be bringing Hank in for surgery that day and that we were going to let his medication continue to do its job. Dr. McDonald was not scheduled to work this day but said she would stay on call for the weekend in case something happened and Hank needed to come in for surgery. Dr. McDonald is wonderful.  We brought Hank in for a checkup because he didn’t eat or drink anything and we were unable to give him his medication the night before.

He was seen by another Doctor at Winrose. She took his temperature, checked his heart rate, and gave us more doses of medication. One of the nurses gave us some tips on how to make sure Hank takes his medication. This involved us making a Hank burrito. She also showed us that force feeding is even messy for her too. Hank stayed in his cage for the rest of the day, watching us from the comfort of his new blanket as we did our normal Saturday things.

Sunday, January 8, 2017

Teekca had to work today so it was just me and Hank at home. When I went to check up on Hank he jumped up and put his paws on the cage to meet me. I opened the door reached my hand in and he climbed right up my arm like he always does. Our little guy was feeling better! I decided to let him roam around the living room and what would you know… he started to play with me! Under the watchful eyes of his feline sisters Hank and I played until I brought out Riley and Darla. We kept Hank apart in our ‘sick time’ cage while he was feeling down. Even though they could always see each other they were so happy to be reunited.

Monday, January 9, 2017

Hank had a follow up appointment today. They gave him a checkup and what would you know, it looks like Hank is almost healthy again! His temperature is normal, his heart rate is normal, and he is back to his personable self. We will continue giving him is medication until he is done on Friday. Hank was on the mend!

Saturday, January 14, 2017

Well it’s been over one week since Hank had his near death experience and we are happy to report that he is pretty much 100%. He is done his medication, is back to eating and drinking, and is back to his playful, mischievous self.

We wrote this story in the hopes to show others how quickly things can go downhill for ferrets. Hank didn’t eat a mysterious foreign body like an earplug, but simply ate his sisters kitten food. We didn’t think anything of it because he eats a mixture of ferret food and cat food every day. What is a little kitten food going to do, right? While maybe adult food is okay for ferrets, definitely keep your kitten food away from them. Kitten food is high in fat which helps the kittens grow. The adult cat food that our ferrets have mixed in with their ferret food is super high in protein and is a bit higher quality than the kitten food we buy. As you already know ferrets are fairly sensitive little creatures and we definitely need to keep a close eye on what they eat. In total Teekca and I have spent around $1300 on Hank this past week on vet visits, medications, and his heated blanket. We hope that you can learn from our very expensive and scary lesson that we learned.

Stewart

&

Teekca

ROCK HARD BANDITS TREATS

When a ferret is surrendered, I often get a half opened package of Bandits Treats.  Pretty soon my bowl is full of partial bags of treats. Even though the treats don’t last long in this house with so many furries begging at my feet; I still come across the odd bag where the treats have turned rock hard.

Now, some of the furries will still chew away on these little “rock hard” treats, but I have mostly old furries and they have a difficult time with these treats.

Instead of throwing them out, I use a good, old fashioned tip, my family has used since I was a kid.  I cut a piece of apple and put it in the treat bag.  Leave it overnight and then discard.

If the treats are still not as soft as you would like, cut a fresh piece of apple. The moisture from the apple allows the treats to soften naturally. Please note, leaving the apple piece in too long will cause your treats to grow mold or ferment. So, please, do not repeat the apple  more than for 2 days.

When my brown sugar gets hard, I do the same thing. A slice of apple will soften that brown sugar in no time flat.

partially used bag of treats(hard as a rock) surrendered with ferret

partially used bag of treats(hard as a rock) surrendered with ferret

slice of apple softens the treats naturally

slice of apple softens the treats naturally

Defective Baby Ferrets For Sale

Thank you for your concern regarding the Kijji ad selling “defect” baby ferrets. I monitor the ferrets for sale on Kijji daily. I will tell you up front that my late husband and I met and became casual friends of her grandfather and grandmother. They started and owned this small family run breeding facility. It was not a large operation on the scale of say Marshall Farms.

I know this family and know that they want the best for their ferrets and take pride in having healthy baby ferrets for sale. They were/ are small private breeder of hamsters, guinea pigs and ferrets. Mr. Dave took great pride in having plump, healthy babies. He persevered through many set backs. Sadly since my husband passed away, I have not been able to visit them but I highly doubt that the standards of care have changed in the last 7 years. Mr. Dave would have instilled this in whomever is now looking after the family business.

When the Manitoba Ferret Association and No Kill Shelter was born in 1997, we had the rare privilege of touring the facilities several times and over tea learnt about the hardships of breeding ferrets. We learnt that not all female ferrets make good moms. Some mom will refuse the nurse their babies, abandoning them each time. Also, some First time ferret moms in their inexperience will “clean” the babies too vigorously resulting in the end of the tail being nipped off or the tip of a toe or even part of an ear. By the second litter they have it figured out. It goes without saying that if the ferret mom keeps doing this to every litter then she needs to be retired from breeding.

I have a personal ferret adopted from a university that eat her first litter. She cleaned them but didn’t know when to stop, it wasn’t intentional cannibalism. She got it right the second time around. She was spayed and I was able to adopt her shortly after. She came with her sister. Her sister was a perfect mom the very  first time, cleaned them up properly and nursed them into plump healthy babies. So, 2 sisters from an original litter, both bred at the same time – one a good mom right off the bat, the other needing to take a second run at it.

Something else too, when you get a large litter of say 8 babies, sometimes the babies in an attempt to nurse will mistake a sibling’s ear for the teat and suckle hard resulting in a deformity. The baby ferret with the suckled ear, is still a healthy baby with a slight deformity.

Pet stores; based on “consumer” demands  will only accept “perfect” baby ferrets. A ferret born missing a toe is rejected and yet it is still a healthy baby ferret. I ferret with a damaged ear or a shortened tail are also considered rejects. Some pet stores will even refuse any Albino baby ferrets because the consumer considers them blood thirsty. HOGWASH!

If they could not find a pet store willing to take them (some do see a bob tailed ferret as a specialty ferret) or if they could not find a home within their extended family ties; – they found themselves between a rock and a hard place. If they sold them directly to the public, some pet stores could scream conflict and threaten to cancel all future purchases.

Now, their granddaughter has found a way to save them. Being ferret breeder does not mean you understand the passion and devotion us ferret owners have for their furries. These are our furry children and no one wants to hear defective. She has a good heart, she was honest about the babies, but used poor choice of words in these ads. The word ‘DEFECT” is repulsive no matter what you are selling. I evokes negative imagery.

The ad should read something like this: Special needs baby ferrets looking for a second chance at a forever home. First time mom overzealous in cleaning her new babies. These healthy babies have some imperfections such as a short tail, missing toe or slightly deformed ear. Serious inquiries only ……………….
Notice how your reaction is totally different!

I have run the no kill ferret shelter for 18 years, Needless to say I love ferrets and am passionate about educating people BEFORE they take home that baby ferret.

Before Kijji, we would get the young ferrets for re-homing. Now, it is mostly  the older (insert un-adoptable), sick, mishandled ferrets that seek refuge. They live out their lives being loved and cared for in our home shelters or in Foster Care. No ferret is turned away even as we struggle to raise enough money for food, litter and medical care.  A membership (you don’t have to participate in any events) helps to fund these costs. Yet so many ferret owners do not realize how much we need their support and do not sign up for that membership.

The cost of that phone line that you used when you had a ferret emergency is paid with from those funds. We were there for you and your ferret. Please, find it in your heart to be there for us.

STILL HOPE FOR SCRAPPY, CAGE MODIFICATION

It has been an emotional roller coaster with Scrappy! At the beginning of the week I was sure that I would have to let her go. Which ever position I put her in her hospital cage is where she stayed. She didn’t even move away from her bowel movement. She wouldn’t lift her head to look at me. I made the vet appointment for Thursday.

Until then, I continued with water therapy, stretching exercises and lots of cuddles. Her right shoulder remains dislocated. On Thursday morning, Scrappy would lift her head and her eyes would follow me.  She could support her head while eating her duck soup. During the stretching exercises it became very evident that the whole right side of the body was compromised. The dislocated shoulder and the nerve compression all the way down to her right back leg. She cannot  weight bear, but if you stroke the back of the leg she will move it forward.

Scrappy, 3 weeks after the accident

Scrappy, 3 weeks after the accident

My vet took the x-rays on Thursday. She didn’t have a broken back. Nerve compression does not show on an x-ray,however her toe curling indicated nerve damage. Dr. Singh is not one to give up and so we went to plan C.  We would do 6 deep tissue laser treatments. The MFA just couldn’t afford this but he kindly offered the treatments at 50% off.  This is still a $150.00 touch which is a big bite out of our limited finances. Dr. Singh also suggested that we try giving her 4 drops a day of the children’s B complex formula. The B complex is a nerve tonic and will help with the necessary healing of the nerves.  The gentleman at Sangsters didn’t bat an eye when I told him the B complex was for a ferret. Apparently years ago, his son owned a ferret! What a small world!

B complex to help with the nerve damage

B complex to help with the nerve damage

So 2 laser treatments a week, daily B complex drops, water therapy, stretching exercises, prayers galore and just maybe this sweetie will pull through.

Meanwhile, I have 4 or 5 Ferret Nation cages with the second version shelving just like what Scrappy hurt herself on. It’s not like I have empty cages to move the ferrets into until the new plastic pans for the Ferret Nation cages arrive.  I have been fretting like crazy. These cages were in use for several years before the injury and yet I am holding my breath praying no one else gets hurt before the shelves get here.

Now anyone who knows me well, knows that I can fix just about anything with 2 items. I am never without these items. Don’t laugh  once you find out because by god they have saved many a day! If DUCT TAPE won’t hold it together, then bring on the drill and ZIP TIES. I have zip ties in black, green and white!

I have zip tied a castor back onto the base of a cage turning a useless donated cage into one that I am still using. I have zip tied J food hoppers to the cage so that ferrets don’t knock them over. I have zip tied shelving to the cage bars to keep them in place. I even zip tied the catch trays for all the litter boxes.

So, duct tape won’t work on the shelf edges as too many of the ferrets will chew on the tape and give themselves a blockage. So…… on to zip ties. How can I make the shelf safer for now. Well I could see the gap where the plastic insert the the metal cross piece left enough room for a paw to get trapped under. Drill a few holes for the zip ties and voila, no more gap! At least any ferret wanting to jump off the shelf into a hammock won’t catch their paws. There is still a small gap from the edge of the plastic to the frame but I can’t close that gap and not sure a paw would fit in the space.

plastic insert zip tied to the metal cross piece and closing the gap

plastic insert zip tied to the metal cross piece and closing the gap

 

 

another view of the plastic insert zip tied to the metal cross piece to close the gaps

I am hoping the new shelving arrives at Pembina, North Dakota in the next 7 to 10 days. Then I just have to pray the weather cooperates so I can drive down and pick them up!

I hope by next Friday, the 16th, I will have even better news!